Riddim & Spice Jamaican Oxtail, Goat Curry

Riddim & Spice Jamaican Oxtail, Goat Curry

Riddim & Spice Jamaican Oxtail and Goat Curry
On my last Holiday at Trelawney Beach Jamaica, I hosted a beach party that was held beside our hotel having a large pit beach fire with help from a well experienced true Jamaican grand mother native chef cooking up a serious feast to celebrate our friendship.
I was told she was the best cook on the Island and has catered many weddings and parties during the many decades. I watched her closely as she masterfully made dumplings in her experienced hand for the oxtail stew that were pillow soft.
She put her expert touch on a pot of goat bone curry and the aroma lingered in the still beach air.
She had mashed fire roasted breadfruit and callaloo stewed greens, peas and rice and a delicious cucumber, tomato, onion mango salad with a sweet and sour dressing along with a boiled dressing coleslaw.
Her fried Jonny cakes was a treat on it’s own.
The juicy marrow bones laden with tender fall of the bone meat sent a spicy hot sensation to my lips and tongue which was soon brought under control with a sip of cold Beers and a Ting or two.
I soon found out that most all the Caribbean Islands had many versions being the main source of protein besides fish was either oxtail, goat or chicken.

I met Andre and Mr. Curry at Riddim & Spice here in Vancouver and over the 30 years tried the many take out versions using the available ingredients found here. I also would get my jerk seasonings and roti wraps here on Commercial Blvd; Fresh cuts of oxtail and goat are available in many chain grocery stores especially the ones that cater to the ethnic community. I know from experience as a chef that there are a lot of people that have never tasted goat and are delicate about doing so. But I also know that there are a lot more people trying to eat healthy proteins that are diet friendly and goat is on the top in that category. Goat meat is 50%-65% lower in fat than similarly prepared beef, but has similar protein content. The department of health also has reported that saturated fat in cooked goat meat is 40% less than that of chicken, even with the skin removed. If you roast, grill or stew oxtail and goat give it a try and here is a easy recipe to follow that will give you a good burst of Jamaican cuisine to take away the on coming winter blues.

thekitchenman Jamaican Curry;
3 lb. oxtail and goat meat (buy cut up in bite size pieces)
Seasonings
1 large onion (chopped)
2 cloves garlic (chopped)
1 scotch bonnet pepper (chopped and seeded)
Wash hands after handling.
3 oz. Jamaican curry powder
1 oz. ground black pepper
2 tbsp. sea salt
4 sprig. fresh thyme sprigs
6 pimento seeds crushed (Allspice berries)
1/2 oz. vinegar
2 oz. canola oil
1 oz Jamaican curry powder
Wash meat with vinegar and some water. Rub in all the seasonings into the meat and let it sit in the refrigerator for 1 or 2 hours.
Remove the meat from the refrigerator and then remove the seasoning by rinsing off the goat meat with a cup of water and collect all residues in a bowl and set aside,
In a saucepan, heat the oil on med high and add 1 oz. curry powder to the oil and stir until the color starts to change.
Put the meat in the saucepan now. Stir the meat in the hot oil for two minutes; be careful not to burn the meat.
Add 1 oz. water to the pan, keep stirring until the meat looks like the muscles are tightening up.
Now turn down the heat to medium and add 2 cups of water to the meat in the saucepan. Cover the pot and let this stew simmer for 20 minutes. Check on the meat in the pot, stir again and add enough water to cover the meat.
Simmer for another 20 minutes, and then check to see if the meat is medium soft.
Now add the seasoning water you saved earlier to the saucepan.
Let the stew simmer for another 40 minutes on a slightly lower heat. Add some cut up potatoes if you like and add bread crumbs if the sauce is to loose.
Serve with brown rice and a side salad.
YAH MON!